Burundi:
Political upheaval

image-landscape-3 Since the crisis began in April, some 3,000 young Burundians have arrived in the Nyarugusu refugee camp in Tanzania without their families.

Over 215,000 Burundians, half of whom are children, fled their homes in 2015 to seek refuge in neighbouring countries. Violence yet again gripped the small Central African country, still recovering from a 12-year-long civil war that claimed the lives of 300,000. Burundians had been hopeful for peace after two democratic elections, but President Pierre Nkurunziza chose to defy constitutional term limits, sparking renewed violence, a failed military coup and postponed peace talks.

Hundreds of Burundians are seeking safety in already overcrowded camps in Tanzania, now not only among the world’s oldest camps but also the third largest, housing over 120,000 people. Refugees are forced to live for months in cramped shelters with wet floors, incubators for respiratory infections and waterborne diseases. To ease overcrowding, the government of Tanzania reopened two former camps, with a third slated to open in 2016. The IRC has been providing support to Burundian refugees in Tanzania since 1993, escalating our response in 2015.

We provide emergency health services and reunite separated refugee children with their families, ensuring they have a supportive environment. We are also educating youth (particularly girls) about reproductive health and HIV/AIDS and providing empowering social and recreational activities and life skills training. “While refugees in Europe are making headlines, the international community must also remember that the situation for Burundians in neighboring countries is equally devastating,” cautions Elijah Okeyo, Country Director for the IRC in Tanzania.

We provide emergency health services and reunite separated refugee children with their families, ensuring they have a supportive environment. We are also educating youth (particularly girls) about reproductive health and HIV/AIDS and providing empowering social and recreational activities and life- skills training. “While refugees in Europe are making headlines, the international community must also remember that the situation for Burundians in neighboring countries is equally devastating,” cautions Elijah Okeyo, country director for the IRC in Tanzania.

“While refugees in Europe are making headlines, the international community must also remember that the situation for Burundians in neighboring countries is equally devastating.”

Elijah Okeyo
IRC Country Director
speaker

PROVIDING EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE AND BUILDING A MORE STABLE FUTURE


The IRC provides emergency and reproductive health services, life skills counseling and job training to Burundian refugees. We help reunite separated refugee children with their families and provide services to women and survivors of sexual violence.

icon1-house

50% of all Burundian refugees who fled their homes in 2015 are children.


icon1-house

The IRC has built 10 learning centers for some 30,000 Burundian children, ages 3 to 17, at the Nyarugusu refugee camp in Tanzania.

image-landscape-2 Burundian refugee women wait to be seen at the IRC’s reproductive health clinic at the Nyaragusu camp in Tanzania.
image-landscape-2 The IRC’s Jonia Karumuna greets Burundian refugees arriving in the Nyaragusu camp where she refers them to medical care and counseling.

Millions on the Move


THE SYRIAN REFUGEE CRISIS

Responding to the World’s Worst Displacement Crisis

The IRC is the only international relief agency working on all fronts of the Syrian crisis, assisting those displaced inside Syria and those who have sought refuge in neighboring countries, Europe and the U.S.


Beyond the Syrian Crisis: Millions in need worldwide


Ebola Crisis: The Road to Redemption

EBOLA CRISIS
-

The Road to
Redemption



At the height of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, Redemption Hospital in Liberia was forced to shut down. In early 2015, the IRC stepped in to renovate the hospital. Here is the story of its rebirth.

Read More ➞
ebloa-message